I've found that miso is often misunderstood in the western culture, which is unfortunate because it's so incredibly beneficial for our health. Miso is a thick paste made with fermented soybeans and different types of grains. It's used for making sauces, pickling vegetables or meats, and for making one of my absolute favorites ~ Miso Soup. Miso is high in protein, vitamins and minerals and it's definitely worth trying if you haven't before. This soup is a staple in our diet during the fall and winter months. Anytime one of us feels a cold coming on, I whip up a batch and it helps stop the cold virus in its tracks.

 

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp avocado oil

1 yellow onion, diced

1 1/2 Tbsp fresh ginger, peeled and grated

4 cloves garlic, minced

3 celery stalks, thinly sliced

2 carrots, sliced on a mandolin slicer (or thinly sliced)

6 cups water

4 green onions, thinly sliced

6 small cremini mushrooms, sliced

5 Tbsp white miso paste*

4 large kale leaves, stems removed and thinly sliced

Fresh ground pepper

 

Directions:

Put oil and onion to a large pot over medium heat. Sauté until the onion is softened, about 5 min.

Add ginger and garlic. Sauté for 1 min.

Then add the celery, carrots and water and bring to a boil. Then cover and reduce to a simmer. Continue to simmer until veggies begin to soften. About 15 min.

Add the green onion and mushrooms. Cover and gently simmer until vegetables are cooked through. About 5 min.

Carefully transfer 1 cup of the warm water from the pot to a bowl, then whisk in the miso paste. This helps the miso mix into the water easily.

Once the paste has been dissolved, pour the miso water into the pot and stir to combine.

Add the kale and simmer until it has wilted. About 1 min.

Remove from heat, add fresh pepper to taste. Enjoy your hearty miso soup!

Note: Also, I always buy organic miso to ensure I'm not consuming miso that has been made with genetically modified soybeans.

*Unpasteurized miso is rich in live enzymes that are good for our health. Therefore, it's important to always add miso towards the end of cooking because prolonged cooking destroys these beneficial enzymes.

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